About Grace Lutheran


Welcome to Grace !

At Grace we welcome, and include, everyone. We believe it is wrong to discriminate against anyone. We know our own brokenness, and follow Jesus who forgives us, and calls us to be part of a community beyond race, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, and social status.

In his ministry, Jesus broke down barriers among people and practiced radical love of neighbor. We endeavor to do the same. We invite you to risk being part of our imperfect community as we follow Jesus and serve others. You are welcome here.

At Grace Lutheran we:
  • Try to trust God's grace for us and practice grace and love towards all people;
  • Try to live faithfully in Gods word;
  • Learn how to guide our faith by scripture in todays world;
  • Generously give of ourselves to help people in need;
  • Worship and commune together regularly.
Open all Close all
  • Council
    Open all Close all
    • President - Dan Kotovsky
      Stacks Image 121664
      The congregational council president is the chief lay officer of the congregation and is responsible for working closely with the Pastor and members of council to ensure that the affairs of the church are conducted in keeping with Grace Lutheran’s constitution and by-laws. The president functions as a liaison among the pastor, the council and the congregation.

      The president is also responsible for running the monthly council meetings and the congregation’s annual budget and program meetings. Finally, the president welcomes new members to the congregation and performs other ceremonial duties in conjunction with the Pastor.
    • Vice President - Rich Hettinger
      Stacks Image 121672

      Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Donec dui lacus, ultricies eget consectetur ac, viverra sit amet orci. Aenean sed maximus ipsum, vitae efficitur lectus. Nullam magna eros, faucibus non vulputate nec, viverra nec ligula. Quisque nisi mi, pulvinar a tincidunt eget, varius sit amet lectus. Nullam sed congue elit. Vivamus ullamcorper ultrices nibh sit amet mollis. Nulla facilisi. In efficitur quam dolor, eget consequat magna vestibulum eget. Suspendisse non aliquam turpis. In eu tempor metus. Duis ultrices massa sit amet nisi volutpat, at sollicitudin purus molestie. Aliquam erat volutpat.

    • Treasurer - Carl Malmstrom
      Stacks Image 121680

      Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Donec dui lacus, ultricies eget consectetur ac, viverra sit amet orci. Aenean sed maximus ipsum, vitae efficitur lectus. Nullam magna eros, faucibus non vulputate nec, viverra nec ligula. Quisque nisi mi, pulvinar a tincidunt eget, varius sit amet lectus. Nullam sed congue elit. Vivamus ullamcorper ultrices nibh sit amet mollis. Nulla facilisi. In efficitur quam dolor, eget consequat magna vestibulum eget. Suspendisse non aliquam turpis. In eu tempor metus. Duis ultrices massa sit amet nisi volutpat, at sollicitudin purus molestie. Aliquam erat volutpat.

    • Christian Eductaion - Nancy Torrente
      Stacks Image 123568

      The congregational council education chair is a lay officer of the congregation and is responsible for running the children’s Sunday School. This includes choosing a curriculum, preparing lesson plans, purchasing supplies and scheduling volunteer teachers.
      Learning is a lifetime activity. As such, it is also the responsibility of the education chair ensure that all members of Grace and the community have access to Christian education by making sure that confirmation classes, adult forum, and Bible studies are running smoothly.

    • Music & Worship - Lynn Perry
      Stacks Image 121696

      Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Donec dui lacus, ultricies eget consectetur ac, viverra sit amet orci. Aenean sed maximus ipsum, vitae efficitur lectus. Nullam magna eros, faucibus non vulputate nec, viverra nec ligula. Quisque nisi mi, pulvinar a tincidunt eget, varius sit amet lectus. Nullam sed congue elit. Vivamus ullamcorper ultrices nibh sit amet mollis. Nulla facilisi. In efficitur quam dolor, eget consequat magna vestibulum eget. Suspendisse non aliquam turpis. In eu tempor metus. Duis ultrices massa sit amet nisi volutpat, at sollicitudin purus molestie. Aliquam erat volutpat.

    • Social Ministry - Mike Wade
      Stacks Image 121704

      The Social Ministry Chairperson is the lay person responsible for managing and directing Grace's outreach programs. This position works closely with the other council members to develop and execute outreach programs, both locally and globally, that give tangible expression to God's love and grace. In recent years Grace has participated and continues to participate in activities in support of local soup kitchens and homeless shelters which give temporary aid to those in need in Morris County. We also raise money for many other causes throughout the year as well as the NJ Synod of the ELCA.

    • Evangelism - Laura-Ann Quinones
      Stacks Image 121712
      The congregational council evangelism chair is a lay officer of the congregation and is responsible for advertising, inspirational banners and posters, welcoming and including all visitors and members into the church weekly, maintaining welcome packets and gifts for visitors, and updating and maintaining social media feeds.  

      The evangelism chair is responsible for spreading our Christian values into the surrounding communities and insuring the community knows that we are a inclusive, welcoming, and loving church open to all people regardless of past faith affiliations,  race, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, and social status. 

      It is the responsibility of the evangelism chair to insure that we remember that in Jesus' ministry, Jesus broke down barriers among people and practiced radical love of neighbor and that we endeavor to do the same at all times inviting all to risk being part of our imperfect community as we follow Jesus and serve others.

      All are welcome here. 
    • Property - Fred Ertel
      Stacks Image 121728

      The property chairperson is responsible for the upkeep and well being of the church buildings as well as the church parsonage. The chairperson is not responsible to do the maintenance work but is responsible to be aware of needed work and prioritize which work should be performed, by volunteers or professionals and in a cost effective manner. Safety is a number one concern. We currently have a sexton to keep the church buildings clean, we schedule spring and fall cleanup days for volunteers to do projects outside normal cleaning. We pay for lawn service and snow removal and we hire contractors for other major projects.

    • Stewardship - Bruce St. John
      Stacks Image 121720

      Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Donec dui lacus, ultricies eget consectetur ac, viverra sit amet orci. Aenean sed maximus ipsum, vitae efficitur lectus. Nullam magna eros, faucibus non vulputate nec, viverra nec ligula. Quisque nisi mi, pulvinar a tincidunt eget, varius sit amet lectus. Nullam sed congue elit. Vivamus ullamcorper ultrices nibh sit amet mollis. Nulla facilisi. In efficitur quam dolor, eget consequat magna vestibulum eget. Suspendisse non aliquam turpis. In eu tempor metus. Duis ultrices massa sit amet nisi volutpat, at sollicitudin purus molestie. Aliquam erat volutpat.

    • Ex Officio Member - Pastor Carol Petersen
      Stacks Image 121736

      Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Donec dui lacus, ultricies eget consectetur ac, viverra sit amet orci. Aenean sed maximus ipsum, vitae efficitur lectus. Nullam magna eros, faucibus non vulputate nec, viverra nec ligula. Quisque nisi mi, pulvinar a tincidunt eget, varius sit amet lectus. Nullam sed congue elit. Vivamus ullamcorper ultrices nibh sit amet mollis. Nulla facilisi. In efficitur quam dolor, eget consequat magna vestibulum eget. Suspendisse non aliquam turpis. In eu tempor metus. Duis ultrices massa sit amet nisi volutpat, at sollicitudin purus molestie. Aliquam erat volutpat.

  • What is a Lutheran?
    WHAT WE BELIEVE!

    For Lutherans, worship matters.

    In fact, worship lies at the heart of how we understand ourselves together. While some of the approaches to worship may differ from one congregation to another, we hold certain things in common.

    There is a basic pattern for worship among Lutherans.
    We gather.
    We encounter God’s Word.
    We share a meal at the Lord’s table.
    And we are sent into the world.

    But we do not think about worship so much in terms of what we do. Worship is fundamentally about what God is doing and our response to God’s action.

    Worship is an encounter with God, who saves us through the life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ.
  • About the ELCA


    A little about ELCA Lutherans …

    Lutherans are Christians who accept the teachings of Martin Luther (1483 – 1546), a German theologian who realized that there were significant differences between what he read in the Bible and the practices of the Roman Catholic church at that time.

    What started as an academic debate escalated into a distinct separation between the Roman Catholic church of the time and those who accepted Luther’s suggested reforms. "Lutheran" became the name of the group that agreed with Luther’s convictions.

    Today, nearly five centuries later, Lutherans still celebrate the Reformation on October 31 and still hold to the basic principles of Luther’s theological teachings, such as
    Grace alone, faith alone, Scripture alone.

    These comprise the very essence of Lutheranism:
    We are saved by the grace of God alone -- not by anything we do;
    Our salvation is through faith alone -- a confident trust in God, who in Christ promises us forgiveness, life and salvation; and
    The Bible is the norm for faith and life -- the true standard by which teachings and doctrines are to be judged.

    Over the years, different Lutheran church bodies have been established and organized to meet the needs of Lutherans in communities and nations all over the world. The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America is the largest Lutheran group in North America, founded in 1988 when three North American Lutheran church bodies united: The American Lutheran Church, the Association of Evangelical Lutheran Churches and the Lutheran Church in America merged.

    Lutherans are part of a reforming movement within the whole Christian church; as a part of practicing their faith, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) and its predecessors have engaged in ecumenical dialogue with other church bodies for decades.

    Lutheranism is a faith tradition that is open to all, regardless of background.

    The ELCA alone is almost five million members strong, with nearly 10,500 congregations across the U.S., Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.  We welcome you to learn more about our church and find out how we can help you along life’s path.

    To learn more about us check out these links:
  • A Hard Truth - Message from the Bishop

    Learning to speak a hard truth

    Needle barely moved on ELCA becoming a diverse church

    Consider this: how many of you are left-handed? Of those of you who are, how many times a day are you reminded that you are left-handed? At every meal when you sit next to a right-handed person and bump elbows? When you use scissors? When you write? When you shake hands?


    Now, how many of you are right-handed? Chances are you never have to think about being right-handed. Most of us are right-handed. The world is set up for right-handed people. This isn’t necessarily bad. It just is.


    Elizabeth A. Eaton

    The problem starts when the practical application of an economy of scale slides into a value judgment, when the majority’s physical characteristic shifts from an objective fact to a subjective model of what is proper and good.


    Right-handed people become a privileged group. Left-handedness becomes not a simple handedness but something of less value, limited accessibility in the right-handed world, and sometimes even a character flaw. We speak of “left-handed compliments,” the word “sinister” derives from the Latin for “left,” and some of us are old enough to remember when parents and teachers would try to force left-handed children to use their right hands.

    I use this illustration as a way to start to look at some of the complicated issues involved in this church’s uneven, and still incomplete, effort to be a truly diverse and multicultural people.


    We see the glorious vision of redeemed humanity “from every nation, from all tribes and peoples and languages, standing before the throne and before the Lamb” (Revelation 7:9), but do not see this reflected in our communities of faith. The U.S. is becoming increasingly diverse. Your children’s or your grandchildren’s soccer team might more accurately reflect local demographics than Sunday mornings at church.


    We are an overwhelmingly white denomination in a culture that is still majority European American. Those of us who are white almost never have to think about being white. We can consider ourselves the norm. People of color, then, are implicitly expected to adapt. This, in and of itself, doesn’t mean that we who are white are bad people. It’s a system and reality that is already in place. We didn’t create it. In fact, many of us can point to our own persecuted ancestors who came to America to have an opportunity for a better life.


    But no matter where we came from or why we had to come, the mere physical characteristic of being white admits us to a certain degree of privilege, just as being right-handed is easier than being left-handed in our culture. 


    I believe this church truly longs for the realization of the vision in Revelation, or at least the glorious company of multicultural young people on a hillside meadow singing the 1970’s Coca Cola jingle “I’d like to teach the world to sing in perfect harmony.” I yearn, not for a color-blind world, but for a color-amazed world where distinctiveness and diversity aren’t washed out but are noticed and treasured as God’s gracious gift. The only norm is that we are all children of God and sisters and brothers to one another. 


    We aren’t there yet. In the first 25 years of the ELCA’s existence we’ve barely moved the needle on the percentage of our members who are people of color or whose primary language is not English. We have a beautiful theology of justification and grace, we point to the crucified Christ as clear expression of God’s love for all people, we are realistic about human brokenness — surely this is good news for anyone and everyone. And yet ….


    At the 2013 Churchwide Assembly we declared that the church is “Always being made new.” Perhaps now is the time for us to begin to talk to one another. This is Epiphany, the season of the church year when the person and ministry of Christ are revealed to us in powerful Gospel stories each Sunday, a good season to start.


    We can begin by contemplating a Messiah who renounced privilege to love us (Philippians 2:5-11). And, trusting that we are forgiven sinners, we can even speak the hard truth.


  • Our Bishop
    Stacks Image 412

    Presiding Bishop
    About The Rev. Elizabeth A. Eaton


    The Rev. Elizabeth A. Eaton was elected as the ELCA’s fourth presiding bishop at the 2013 ELCA Churchwide Assembly.

    Born in Cleveland on April 2, 1955, Eaton earned a Master of Divinity degree from Harvard Divinity School in Cambridge, Mass., and a Bachelor of Arts degree in music education from the College of Wooster in Wooster, Ohio.

    Ordained June 4, 1981, Eaton served as assistant pastor of All Saints Lutheran Church in Worthington, Ohio; interim pastor of Good Hope Lutheran Church in Boardman, Ohio; and pastor of Messiah Lutheran Church in Ashtabula, Ohio. She was elected bishop of the ELCA Northeastern Ohio Synod in 2006 and re-elected in May 2013.

    Eaton is involved in a number of boards and committees. She is a board member of Trinity Lutheran Seminary and Capital University, both based in Columbus, Ohio. She is a member of the Lutheran Episcopal Coordinating Committee and the ELCA Conference of Bishops Executive Committee. She also serves on the Conference of Bishops Domestic Ready Bench and serves in roles with the ELCA Malaria Campaign, the Lutheran Metropolitan Ministry, PORTICO Philosophy of Benefits Task Force, Ohio Council of Churches and Lutheran Planned Giving in Ohio.

    Prior to her election, Eaton was the liaison bishop to the ELCA Church Council and a member of the ELCA Memorials Committee for the 2007, 2011 and 2013 ELCA Churchwide Assemblies. She served as a delegate to The Lutheran World Federation Assembly in Budapest in 1984, on the review team for Lutheran Episcopal dialogues in 1982, and she was a part of the delegation from the ELCA’s predecessor church bodies to the German Democratic Republic in 1982.

    Eaton’s husband, the Rev. T. Conrad Selnick, an Episcopal priest, is pastor of St. Christopher’s-by-the-River in Gates Mills, Ohio. They are parents of two adult children, Rebeckah and Susannah.


Grace Lutheran, Mendham NJ

Stacks Image p121149_n121028

Join us for Worship Sunday’s 10 am!

We are Inclusive - All are Welcome!

Worship

Sunday 10:00 am
1st Saturday Service
5pm Sept-May

Sunday School - 10:00 am
Adult Forum - 10:45 am


Pastor Carol A. Petersen

email or call (973) 543-7595

Directions
65 E Main St, Mendham NJ 07945

Follow us on facebook!

email webmaster

Scroll to see more!